Tashkent Agreement Date

In accordance with the Tashkent Declaration, ministerial talks were held on 1 and 2 March 1966. Despite the fact that these discussions were unproductive, diplomatic exchanges continued throughout the spring and summer. No results were achieved as a result of these discussions, due to differences of opinion on the Kashmir issue. The news of the Tashkent declaration shocked the people of Pakistan who expected more concessions from India than they received. Things got even worse when Ayub Khan refused to speak out and went to solitary confinement instead of announcing the reasons for signing the agreement. Protests and riots broke out in different locations across Pakistan. [3] To appease the anger and concerns of the people, Ayub Khan decided to take the matter to the people on January 14, 1966 by addressing the nation. It was the difference on the Tashkent declaration that eventually led to Zulfikar Ali Bhutto`s withdrawal from Ayub`s government, who later founded his own party called Pakistan People`s Party. Although Ayub Khan was able to satisfy the concerns of the people, the Tashkent declaration severely tarnished his image and was one of the factors that led to his downfall. [8] In India, the people also criticized this agreement because the Pakistani president and the Indian prime minister did not sign a guerrilla pact in Kashmir. After the day of this statement, Prime Minister Lal Bahadur died of a sudden heart attack. After him, no one accepted this statement and it was ignored by the next government. An agreement signed in the Soviet city of Tashkent by Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri and Pakistani President Ayub Khan to end the Second Indo-Pakistani War for Kashmir.